Anaerobicaly - Composted Environmental Wastes as Organic Fertilizer and Identification of the Associated Fungal Colony

  • S. O. Dania Department of Soil Science, Ambrose Alli University, Ekpoma.
  • C. Obigho Department of Soil Science, Ambrose Alli University, Ekpoma
  • M. I. Dania Department of Food Science and Technology Federal polytechnic, Auchi

Abstract

The increasing generation and unhealthy disposal of organic waste in Nigeria necessitate this experiment. The anaerobic composting process of sawdust, wood shavings and poultry manure was conducted at Ambrose Alli University, Ekpoma, and their associated fungi were identified and isolated. The fungi identification was achieved by observing the morphological characteristics of the individual compost materials alongside the use of electric photo microscope. The isolation of fungi colony was carried out by serially diluting a sample of each compost material that were cultured in a Potato Dextrose Agar (PDA). From the analysis, the compost sample was high in organic carbon, nitrogen, phosphorus, calcium, magnesium, potassium and other mineral elements. The nine pure potential cellulose degrading fungi identified were; Aspergillus candidus, Aspergillus fumigatus, Aspergillus niger, Fusarium species, Penicillium aethiopicum, Penicillium funculosumwere, Penicillium oxalicum, Penicillium polonicum, and Penicillium variable.  In conclusion, the above named fungi were responsible for the decomposition of lignified materials such as sawdust and wood shavings. In conclusion, the above named fungi were responsible for the decomposition of lignified materials such as sawdust and wood shavings. It is important to note that these compost were found to be rich in organic matter and mineral nutrients which make them ideal supplement to inorganic fertilizer, and could be useful for sustainable crop production.

Published
Dec 1, 2017
How to Cite
DANIA, S. O.; OBIGHO, C.; DANIA, M. I.. Anaerobicaly - Composted Environmental Wastes as Organic Fertilizer and Identification of the Associated Fungal Colony. Arid Zone Journal of Engineering, Technology and Environment, [S.l.], v. 13, n. 6, p. 810-816, dec. 2017. ISSN 2545-5818. Available at: <http://azojete.com.ng/index.php/azojete/article/view/294>. Date accessed: 18 oct. 2018.
Section
Articles